David Mostovoy

Recent Posts

How C-stores Can Turn Social Media Interaction into Employee Action

By David Mostovoy

 

Social media convenience stores

Chances are that your convenience store chain has an active social media presence. Considering that the “big guys” like Wawa, Sheetz and Speedway have well more than 1 million followers, you definitely want to get in on that extra brand visibility, if you haven’t already.

But being on social media is more than just posting your new products and promotions; it’s about being a good community member. And like any other aspect of your operations, it requires a good strategy.

As part of their Social Media Awards, Convenience Store Decisions recently addressed the fact that studying the data of your social media following can pay off when it comes to promotional and partnership opportunities. Data can also help you to understand where your base customer spends the most time, so you can tailor your paid media accordingly to further extend your reach. It can also help you target the social media followers known as “influencers,” the people who share posts. Inviting followers to give their feedback on promotions, offering contests on social media and asking trivia questions are all valuable ways to engage your audience and ensure that visibility.

CSD also discusses the benefits of being an “active listener” on social media. Again, using data can also help you “cut through the noise” of competing viewpoints over a product update or promotion. If you’ve made a decision to change a yearly promotion or pull a product, it could very well be that the complainers are going to be the most vocal. Not overreacting to the naysayers and taking your quieter social media followers into account is important, and data can help inform those decisions and essentially make your brand a better listener.

However, there’s another important part of being an active listener, and that’s being an active responder.

Turning Complaints into Store-Level Action  

How does a convenience store brand respond to a customer complaint? A look at any Facebook comments section for an active retailer shows you plenty of “love” (great for sharing with your audience) and “hate” (wish you could bury it). DO NOT, and I repeat DO NOT, delete negative feedback. There’s nothing worse than being accused of censoring customer feedback because it shows an unwillingness to address real concerns and improve your brand. Plus, no one likes being ignored or flat out rejected!

To that point, streamline your interactions. Most convenience store operators with a regular social media presence are in the habit of asking customers to send them a private message with their contact information. The assumption is that the convenience store operator will offer the customer a coupon or discount off their next purchase. This can turn a negative interaction into a positive outcome that reinforces customer loyalty.

So once you’ve addressed an individual customer’s concern you can close the book on this interaction, right? Not even close!

Chances are that when you’re asking the customer for their personal contact information, you’re also asking them to provide the store number from their receipt. This is a prime opportunity to follow up with the store in question. For instance, if an employee forgot the bacon on a customer’s sandwich, you don’t have to play “Big Brother” and immediately fire off a message directed at that foodservice team. However, if several complaints are being logged against one store, then that indicates a more significant operations problem that’s worth addressing.


With the right platform, you can follow up easily and, if necessary, in real time!

With Zenput, it’s possible for a senior management team to take the social media interactions log, break it down by location and assign tasks to the regional manager and/or store manager. A senior manager may choose to start with a directive to the regional manager: “Multiple customer complaints about missing sandwich components at store #14. Please visit store and report back.” The directive would appear immediately on the regional manager’s mobile device and would remain an open task until they reported back.

Upon investigation at the store level, the regional manager may find a staffing problem or an inventory problem. They could report this in their notes to senior managers, who might then ask the regional manager to address the issue and provide an update in a couple of weeks. Hopefully, in that same time, the resolution will be evident through a lack of customer complaints on social media.

Assigning tasks creates a chain of accountability and improves communication. It’s also collaborative and supports teamwork. If a customer reports that a store manager or employee made their day, be sure that message gets relayed at the store level as well!

Consider taking your social media interactions to the next level by turning comments into real action. Learn more about Zenput’s checklists, audits, forms and reports by clicking here.  

5 Musts for Every Restaurant Inspection

By David Mostovoy

restaurant inspection photo.jpg

When a city’s health department decides to inspect restaurants, they can cover a tremendous amount of ground in what seems like a relatively short amount of time. For example, the Philadelphia Department of Health inspected nearly 500 restaurants, delis and other eateries between Nov. 9 and Nov. 21. Good news for local restaurants: they only found a few serious offenders.

In today’s click-bait world, restaurant health inspection stories seem to be on the rise. The Business Journal publications are especially in tune with the latest reports in various municipalities across the U.S. Some of these journals make it a point to publish the findings as they’re reported. Years ago, if a restaurant was cited for an offense, it could make the paper, but then eventually it would go away. The restaurant would fix the problem, reopen if it had closed, and life would go on. In today’s news environment, bad publicity has a permanent home that’s just a quick search and a click away. It’s imperative for restaurants to not wind up on the “naughty” list anywhere because it can do irreparable damage to their brand.

Based on our experience working with restaurant operators, these are the top 5 things to audit weekly in a restaurant:

  1. Food Safety/Cleanliness – Well, this may get a “duh” response since it’s a restaurant, but you’d be surprised with what turns up in some reports, especially when it comes to food that isn’t stored at correct temperatures. This is one of the most egregious offenses because it’s so simple to avoid, yet so costly to all involved parties if not appropriately addressed. It all comes down to working thermometers (for food storage and cooking of meats), adherence to food preparation guidelines, and adherence to proper cleaning procedures.

 P.S. If the food thermometer issue is a sticking point, you can use the BluTherm food thermometer to digitally record readings, which makes auditing process easier.

  1. Make sure employees are adhering to rules – Because that’s the reality: there are rules that are more than guidelines or suggestions. You may have heard this past week that Hawaii may become the next state (among just a handful) to require food handler certification at either a state or county level. If you are in one of those states, your restaurant audit needs to include employee records. Other routine tasks, that include cleaning and inventory management, must also be accounted for on a regular basis.

  2. Ability to report to management. How many times do you mean to send that email or follow up by phone, but something comes up and suddenly you’re pulled away from the task at hand? It happens to all of us. But not reporting issues as they arise in restaurants is where it can get dangerous or, at the very least, negligent. “If you see something, say something” needs to apply to restaurant operations and managers need real-time tools to confidently report any issues they encounter during audits.

  3. Restaurant condition – To the point of reporting any issues, part of the restaurant audit needs to address the condition of the facility. “Standing water” can appear as a note on a health inspector’s record because it can lead to mold, mildew and invite pests. Routinely check for leaks on the interior/exterior walls, ceilings and other permanent fixtures. Also be sure to check the lighting and utilities like gas and water.

  4. Ensure marketing materials are in compliance – Restaurant audits aren’t just about the nuts and bolts of the facility. Have the menus been updated to reflect the latest items? Is there signage in the store reminding customers of the latest promotion? Are prices accurate? The restaurant audit is the perfect opportunity to check these finer details, as they reflect on your brand.

Zenput is the mobile, cloud-based solution that helps restaurant operators gain location-by-location insight on key metrics and maintain accountability across the organization. Learn more about Zenput’s functionality for restaurant operators by clicking here. 

Topics: Franchise, Restaurants

Contactless Payments: A Passing Fad or Slow Adoption?

By David Mostovoy

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Just a couple of years ago, it seemed like contactless payments—Apple Pay, Android Pay and Google Wallet—were the way of the future. These mobile payment systems rely on near-field communication (NFC) technology. Essentially, holding up your smartphone at the point-of-sale terminal digitizes and replaces the credit-debit card chip and PIN, or the (now outdated thanks to EMV) magnetic-stripe transaction at point-of-sale terminals. Just tap and go, and you’re on your way. Seems easy, right?

So why hasn’t this technology gained more traction? Computerworld recently interviewed industry analysts and asked them that very same question. Nitish Patel of Strategy Analytics narrowed it down to two reasons: 1. Conventional payments are not broken. 2. Consumers aren’t clear on the benefits of switching to mobile payments. Another analyst, Jordan McKee of 451 Research, put it even simpler: Mobile wallets haven’t yet proven they are measurably better than incumbent payment mechanisms, “which generally work quite well,” he added.

Indeed, getting the average U.S. consumer to adopt contactless payment technology may be like teaching an old dog new tricks. I have to admit, recent retailer hacks and ongoing credit/debit card fraud makes me think twice about using my card at certain locations like gas stations. But just because a technology is slow to take off doesn’t mean that it can’t be more widely accepted later. Case in point: the personal computer, which took decades to evolve and gain traction. Analyst Bryan Yeager of eMarketer told Computerworld that he believes we’re still in the early-adopter phase, while yet another analyst believes it will take another three years before NFC payment terminals are widely available in the U.S. Not surprisingly, the biggest adopters of mobile wallets are under the age of 35, according to a study by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

Three key facts about mobile payment technology from the Computerworld report:

  1. Not every store accepts mobile wallets.

  2. Coffee chain competitors Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts, as well as big-box retailer Walmart, are successfully using QR codes via smartphones for transactions.

  3. NFC payments have yet to integrate with loyalty/rewards programs in a way that incentivizes mass market adoption.

Widescale change may happen only if credit card companies and backing banks get on board because so far, mobile device providers have not yet been able to sway the market by themselves. As convenience store retailers are well aware, the current regulatory and legal environment often puts retailers at the mercy of banks.

The most convenience store retailers can do is keep an open mind and consider adopting new payment technologies. We already see some retailers, including QuikTrip, Sheetz and Buc-ee’s accepting Apple Pay, as reported by CSP. Sheetz and QuikTrip previously backed the retailer-led, mobile-payment effort from MCX, which worked in conjunction with Visa and other major credit cards. However, the MCX platform has struggled to gain traction. Retailers, unfortunately, are just along for the ride at this point.

The key takeaway from the Pew report: The biggest obstacle to mobile payment use is concern about financial security. And it’s not your aging parents or grandparents who are most concerned—Millennials led the pack at 74%!

Where Retailers Are Responsible


While retailers may be at the mercy of payments industry forces, they do have direct control over one important aspect of the point-of-sale: The security of payment terminals.

In a time of transition, when customers are increasingly concerned about adopting new technologies, make payments at your store a secure and smooth process. Security is a pillar of customer loyalty in the 21st century, and there’s simply no excuse for not regularly auditing payment terminals. If retailers regularly conduct POS audits, and are generally transparent about security policies and protocols, they will be better positioned to transition their systems—and their customers—to the next technology.

Zenput helps store-level employees ensure the functionality of payment systems and report issues to senior managers. Learn more about how Zenput helps retailers conduct their own security audits in our whitepaper, “Minimizing the Risk of ATM and Gas Pump Skimming with Security Audits." Or check out our Credit Card Reader Audit – POS Form by scheduling a demo.

Related:

ATM Skimming: An Old Battle in Need of a New Solution

Prevent C-store Robberies With Regular Security Audits/Inspections

 

Topics: payment, nfc

Using Technology to Preempt the C-store Customer’s Path to Purchase

By David Mostovoy

convStore1.jpg

It’s the age-old proposition in the convenience store industry: How do you move customers from the forecourt/gas pump area inside to the store?

There are so many factors here working in tandem. If you write a flowchart, it may look something like this:

Clean, well-lit, inviting environment for the customer to want to fill up →  well-placed and accurate promotional signage → (if available) working TVs/digital signage at the pump.There’s a similar flow inside the store:

Clean, well-lit store → well-placed, accurately priced products and promotions → adequate customer service and POS technology to complete the sale.

You begin to see that upselling to an in-store purchase basically comes down to 3 components:

  1. The manual component: a clean, well-maintained forecourt and a clean, well-stocked store
  2. The technology component: ensures vendor/retailer promotional prices are properly reflected
  3. The labor/staffing component: for exceptional customer service

The reality is that in-store sales software is just that—in-store. It can tell you how many iced teas you sold in the summer, but it’s not going to tell you if the promotional signage in the forecourt told customers they should come inside for a buy-one-get-one free deal. Software won’t tell you if your employees at the foodservice counter promoted the new food item or handled the food with the proper food storage and handling techniques.

Software doesn’t provide information on the environment—it only informs about the result.

Pre-Empting the Result

So who are the retailers that answer the age-old proposition? They’re the ones who manage to pre-empt the result by creating informed processes based on what they know works. They’ve broken the 3 key components down to task management as follows:
  1. Processes to clean the store to maintain a welcoming and safe environment.

  2. Working technology—and that doesn’t necessarily mean digital pumps. It could mean conducting a security audit of payment terminals, especially in a time of targeted criminal activity. These are the kind of safeguards that are crucial to your brand.

  3. Real-time store-level insights that could note staffing levels and any other issues that may occur. Say for a period of a month, you send a district manager to a group of stores to complete an operational audit during the peak time of the weekday. Sample questions could be:

- Are there enough attendants at the pumps?

- Are the foodservice attendants following safe food handling and preparation procedures?

- Are there at least two cashiers manning the registers?

- Are gas pump payment systems secure and showing no signs of tampering?

Using a mobile solution like Zenput, senior management can not only create the audit to ensure key tasks are completed, but they can also customize the parameters and get automatically notifiy the appropriate employees when exceptions arise. These are the actionable insights that help retailers improve their operations and as a result, their bottom lines.

Learn more about Zenput’s real-time retail execution capabilities by clicking here.

See Also:

Converting Your Forecourt into a Moneymaker

Today’s Forecourt: Opportunities to Convert Customers from the Pump

Auditing Branded Gas Station Forecourts Can Increase Supplier Payments 

Topics: C-store

5 Standards to Uphold for a Clean Restaurant

By David Mostovoy

clean restaurant.jpeg

What do you do when you haven’t been at a company very long and your CEO wants to go to a favorite restaurant that was recently flagged for unsanitary practices? Well, because the practices were well publicized, you go and hope they acted on the message. This was the awkward situation a friend of mine on the East Coast found herself in this past week. A restaurant in an upscale New Jersey town was one of the cited offenders, according to inspection reports that were collected and published on NJ.com. So there she was, trying to enjoy dinner, knowing that an inspector had recently discovered there was no hand soap in the kitchen restroom. Yikes!  

But it got worse when she realized her favorite sandwich shop not only lacked hand soap at the sink, but also had no visible thermometer in the reach-in refrigerator. Her favorite sushi destination had an unclean food prep service area and floor. At that point, she was ready to stop reading… but how can you?

Ignorance may be bliss if you’re the customer, but it’s not a happy-go-lucky time for the restaurant owner. It’s embarrassing to be called out for things that are easily recognizable and fixable. Health inspections aren’t a trivia game show with mystery questions—operators know in advance what officials look for prior to inspection. It’s time for smarter operations!

Here are 5 standards you should uphold in order to maintain a clean restaurant:

  1. Develop clear and regular cleaning procedures. Cleanliness is not only a safety issue—in some cases, it could impact the quality and safety of food. Check out this story of an employee in Eugene, OR, who starts off her day by cleaning the oven of a pizzeria.

  2. Make sure store-level employees understand and are constantly reminded of the importance of cleanliness. The general manager from the pizzeria in Eugene has a corkboard that keeps up-to-date with food handler cards, so she can check to make sure her employees’ cards aren’t expired. If they are, she hands them off to her kitchen manager to address the issue. The employees must be re-certified before returning to work.

  3. Start documenting progress. Documentation isn’t just a nice-to-have; it creates a vital paper trail that can be vital in documenting important information. And if you have the right tools, you can go paperless and have all information, including past audits and inspections, stored securely on the cloud.

  4. Track the progress of locations to see which stores are clean, which stores aren’t, and why. Communication is key. The point isn’t to dishearten or shame restaurants into submission. It’s to keep customers satisfied. By educating foodservice employees and encouraging managers to develop effective procedures, restaurant operators can keep their customers consistently coming back for more.

  5. Have the ability to follow up on and fix issues at individual locations. What was the point of conducting an audit in the first place? Health inspectors in my friend’s NJ town and elsewhere will return to make sure restaurants are making progress. When it comes to health regulations, restaurant managers need to follow up once a directive is given. It’s not enough to assume these problems have been resolved. Again, documentation and communication is critical.  

The Takeaway

Creating, distributing, and collecting a baseline audit for cleanliness can be a time-consuming process without the right tools. With Zenput, restaurant operators can create a mobile form, edit, and send it out to the appropriate employees as needed. That form is automatically distributed to employees’ mobile devices, and when they answer each question, the results are aggregated in an easy-to-read dashboard. Moreover, a senior manager can set up real-time notifications of any unsanitary condition discovered during the audit. To ensure accountability, the auditor can upload a photo of a problem and the senior manager can follow up with that store to make sure the issues were resolved.

For more examples on how Zenput helps restaurants uphold standards and clean kitchens, visit Zenput's website or request a demo.

Topics: Restaurants, restaurant cleanliness

Rethinking Product Placement for CPG Vendors

By David Mostovoy

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There’s a local, mom-and-pop convenience in my town that gives me an unsettling feeling every time I visit—in fact, I’ve written about it once before for this blog. I live in a small town off the beaten trail, so my options are limited. The truth is that I never know how much I’m going to pay on any given visit to this store because none of the prices are clearly marked. There is also no “flow” to product placement in this store.

Chips, snacks and candy are scattered around the store, with a non-edible, housewares aisle interrupting the product flow. The front of the store has an alcove that would be perfect for grab-and-go beverages. Instead, it’s dedicated to ice cream (off-peak in winter) and shelved beverages, separate from the cold beverages and dairy in the adjacent aisle. The back freezers seem to be underutilized with frozen food packages. And most of the customers seem to order from the fresh food counter anyway. That is one unique feature of this store—a deli/bakery setup that has become somewhat of a fixture in this small town. Indeed, with no marked prices and seemingly no rhyme or reason for product placement, this mom-and-pop store seems to do alright anyway.

But it’s not a good environment to discover new products, which is a lost opportunity for both the operator and CPG vendors. I don’t see many of the “new” snacks and beverages that I see in other stores. If the local town population isn’t demanding better product placement, who is?

This is an industry where retailers and vendors have pay-for-space and pay-for-entry agreements.

So it makes me wonder: Are vendors of new products fighting for shelf space? Do they have the ability to follow up with retailers on product pairings and placement?

Barking Up the Right Strategy

At the start of 2016, the National Retail Federation’s STORES magazine published “20 Ideas Worth Stealing in 2016.” One idea came from the brand barkTHINS, a chocolate snack food company that seemingly came out of nowhere in 2013. For those unfamiliar with barkTHINS, it’s thin, dark chocolate bark made with premium “better-for-you” ingredients, including almonds, pumpkin seeds, blueberries and quinoa. This product came to market so quickly and aggressively (and probably was such a thorn in the side of the big confectioners) that Hershey acquired them in 2016. This wasn’t by luck—barkTHINS fought for it and earned it. Their strategy basically came down to three points:

  1. Area brand managers were stocked with samples of the product.

  2. Brand managers were given freedom to negotiate with retailers when necessary.

  3. barkTHINS equipped brand managers with a dashboard to monitor account visits, product demonstrations and incremental retail sales.

Zenput Helps C-Stores Fight the Good Fight

Whether you’re an established CPG company or a newcomer fighting your way into stores, Zenput is a mobile solution that’s ideal for enterprises that have field reps. It provides a cloud-based mobile platform for account managers to check in and report promotional execution (or lack thereof) in real time. Auditing tools help to ensure compliance with product facings, pricing and promotions. Take a photo to verify shelf placement and easily share it with your team. Zenput also provides historic analysis of data that not only helps CPG companies learn from trends, but also helps them communicate with retail partners.

<p>Both expanding and already-established brands use Zenput during their store visits. Learn more about Zenput’s CPG functionality by clicking here or downloading one of these case studies for more information:

- Learn how Zenput helped Jack Link’s verify compliance for its planogram and rebate program, all while eliminating manual processes. Download Jack Link’s case study.

- Learn how Zenput helped neuro drinks gain better store-level insights for improved quality control and communication with retail partners. Download neuro drinks case study.

 

ATM Skimming: An Old Battle in Need of a New Solution

By David Mostovoy

 Gas pump payment pic.jpg

For as long as people have had bank cards, thieves have targeted the information they hold. Even though old magnetic strips are gradually being phased out for the moresecure EMV chip card technology, attacks on ATM machines and gas pumps are not subsiding. In fact, the attacks are becoming more frequent and sophisticated.

The U.S. Secret Service Criminal Investigation Division recently issued a warning about “skimmers” at gas pumps. Skimmers are criminals who install devices at gas pumps to gain access to a customer’s bank and credit information. They typically break into a gas pump and install a hidden device that steals or skims credit card information off of the magnetic strip. They can even use Bluetooth to immediately send out stolen information.

Unfortunately, just looking at a payment terminal is usually not enough to tell whether it has a skimming device in or on it. Authorities and companies are now training gas station operators to detect skimming devices. In these challenging times, this simple fact can’t be overstated: It’s crucial that convenience store and gas station operators stay ahead of the curve and audit their own payment terminals for skimming devices.

We get it. As an operator, you have enough regulatory issues to worry about, both inside and outside your store. But operators need to start thinking about this issue beyond any immediate inconvenience like staff training. Think instead of the damage to your brand if a skimming device is found at one of your stores. Regaining customers who lose trust in your ability to keep their financial information safe will be a tough, if not impossible, feat.

Preventing skimming attacks is your responsibility to your customers

In fact, the state of Arizona is taking a different approach to combat a spike in fuel skimming attacks over the past year. In what seems like an effort to get business owners to “get with the program” of preventative measures, the Arizona Department of Agriculture’s Weights and Measures Services Division now files a report that details whether fuel station owners who have had instances of skimming had observed industry best-practices leading up to the skimming events. The reports have revealed failures to install security cameras, tamper-proof security tape, and non-standard pump locks. In some of these incidents, thieves with master keys were able to unlock the pumps to freely install skimming devices.

There is simply no excuse for not changing the factory-default locks on pumps. Also, it’s something an audit of the pump and payment terminal would readily not

‘More Paperwork’ is No Longer a Valid Excuse

If you’re a gas station operator who is not routinely checking your payment terminals for skimming devices, you can no longer postpone such audits. In fact, you can build a custom audit form and distribute it easily, right to the mobile devices of your store managers. A platform like Zenput gives you the ability to track compliance among managers and follow up on a store-by-store basis. Better yet, Zenput’s real-time notifications will alert senior managers when a security threat is detected during an audit.

To learn more about how Zenput is used to check the security of ATMs, download the case on Welch ATM by clicking on the "Learn How" button to the right.

Topics: fraud, ATM skimming

Restaurant Cleanliness vs. Customer Service: Which Is More Important?

By David Mostovoy

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As a mobile solution provider in the foodservice industry, we've seen a clear trend in the food industry: that the public is concerned about both quality and food safety issues, especially with the proliferation of review sites and social media like Yelp, Google+, and Facebook. If a consumer has a bad experience, they will go on a site like Yelp and make that experience known to the world. As a result, restaurants must be increasingly concerned about the quality and safety of their food. Here's why that is now more important than ever:

Everyone remembers Chipotle’s difficult year in 2015, when the brand faced a multi-state E.Coli outbreak, followed by a norovirus attack in Boston. It was a big financial blow to one of America’s biggest food chains. According to CheckIt’s report, “The Financial Impact of Getting Food Safety Wrong,” Chipotle started 2016 as no company wants to—with a 44% drop in share price and a loss of $11 billion in value. Analysts have speculated it may take years for Chipotle to rebound.

It’s a sobering reality: if getting food safety wrong can be this devastating for a brand like Chipotle, one of the most popular chains in the nation, imagine the implications for smaller, lesser-known brands.

Why can’t restaurants rebound faster? It all comes down to consumer perceptions. CheckIt conducted a survey among UK consumers and concluded that cleanliness and food hygiene ratings have more influence than customer service when it comes to deciding whether or not to return to a restaurant.

Here are other key findings from this report:

75% of respondents would either never visit a food outlet implicated in a food poisoning/hygiene incident, or would only visit one if its management changed hands. 61% of respondents wouldn’t visit a restaurant of any sort that had a food hygiene rating of 2 or less (on a 0 to 5 scale, with 5 being the highest). 66% of respondents rated unclean or dirty premises as the first or second reason for not returning to a restaurant. 57% cited a low hygiene rating, and just 16% cited slow or poor service.

Here's the key takeaway: Customers would rather put up with bad service than eat at a dirty restaurant.

Preventing What You Can Control

The study offers clear and convincing evidence that consumers take restaurant cleanliness seriously. It also illustrates the importance of preventing the issues that you can control.

Streamlining the process of gathering information and reacting to issues with restaurants’ food safety is vital in fostering an environment that puts food safety above all else. With a mobile solution like Zenput, restaurants can create food safety audits to check for things like:

  • Clean counters and floors
  • Proper cleaning protocols and procedures
  • Appropriate food safety temperatures (compliant to HACCP)
  • Functional kitchen appliances
Zenput makes building and distributing audits and tasks, and gathering data on these types of audits simple. Audits can be distributed, completed by field-level employees, and data collected in a fraction of the time doing the same would take with paper forms. Once the audits are submitted, managers have access to a centralized dashboard with the data from every submission. Managers can pinpoint submissions, filter by users and locations, and set up tasks to be automatically assigned to employees when certain conditions are met.

Real-time solutions really work. Take a closer look at Zenput’s task and operations management solution here.

Topics: Restaurants